Accident

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NTSB session seeks to better document accident investigations

Article | Apr 17, 2013

When the National Transportation Safety Board invited industry groups and government agencies to discuss areas the NTSB should better document in general aviation accident investigations, AOPA and the AOPA Foundation’s Air Safety Institute responded with suggestions based on years of research and experience producing safety-focused training materials for pilots. After the April 3 NTSB “listening session,” AOPA President Craig Fuller called on NTSB Chairman Deborah A.P.

ASF - Mountain Flying

Article | Mar 25, 2013

Mountain Flying Resources High-Altitude Mountain Flying Accident Report Alaska Mountain Passes Colorado Mountain Passes Suggested Western Mountain Routes Northern, West to East Midway, West to East Southern, West to East Northern, East to West Midway, East to West Southern, East to West High-Altitude Mountain Flying High-altitude mountain flying has always been one of the more dangerous activities GA aircraft undertake each year. On average, 17 people die annually in GA accidents in the mountains of Colorado alone.

NTSB, ‘frustrated’ and ‘disheartened,’ tries a new tactic

Article | Mar 13, 2013

The National Transportation Safety Board hopes a new set of safety alerts and videos will leverage limited resources to stem the persistent toll of common mistakes that lead to general aviation accidents.

NTSB chair praises AOPA, ALEA safety efforts

Article | Feb 05, 2013

NTSB Chairman Deborah A. P. Hersman said AOPA and the Airborne Law Enforcement Accreditation Commission went above and beyond in response to agency recommendations that followed accidents.

Accident Case Study: In Too Deep

Article | Jan 14, 2013

If you or your flying club members think you’re immune to being a victim of VFR into IMC because you have an instrument rating, think again. In 2010, there were 29 VFR into IMC accidents involving general aviation aircraft, and 21 of those – or 72 percent – were fatal.