Cross Country

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Father, son solo on same day

Article | Jan 06, 2015

A five-hour round-trip drive to the airfield makes scheduling lessons difficult, but the payoffs include an unobstructed view of Mt. Fuji and the satisfaction of father and son accomplishing goals together.

Aircraft Spotlight

Article | Dec 21, 2014

The Aircraft Spotlight feature looks at an airplane type and evaluates it across six areas of particular interest to flying clubs and their members: Operating Cost, Maintenance, Insurability, Training, Cross-Country, and Fun Factor.

Training Tip: A matter of course

Article | Dec 12, 2014

How would you react to looking down while flying a cross-country and seeing an apparently uncharted airport below?

Club Spotlight

Article | Nov 15, 2014

Based at Augusta Municipal Airport (3AU) in Wichita, Kansas, this club has named all four of its airplanes, and that’s not the only thing that makes GPAC a bit different from other flying clubs.

Training Tip: Fleshing out FICONs

Article | Nov 14, 2014

Especially in northern regions, ‘tis the season when ficons—a notam contraction that translates to" field conditions"—should become a routine preflight item to check.

Sweepstakes 2015: Meet your new 152

Pilot Magazine | Nov 12, 2014

Your “Reimagined” AOPA 2015 Sweepstakes 152 is just like all the 30-something trainers you’ve ever flown—and it’s nothing like them.

Member Profile Daniel Bier

Article | Nov 07, 2014

For Daniel Bier, “Flight of Passage” is more than a book that tells the story of two teens who buy a dilapidated Piper Cub and restore it to take a flight across America in 1966. It’s the reason he and his father started taking cross-country flights in a Piper Archer a few years ago.

Silent night

Pilot Magazine | Nov 07, 2014

>During a recent gathering of local pilots, some were surprised to learn that I rarely fly cross-country at night in single-engine airplanes.

Hypoxia: Insidious emergency

Article | Oct 15, 2014

Many in-flight emergencies arrive with fanfare: annunciator lights, engine sputtering, smoke. Hypoxia may insinuate itself into the cockpit quietly, without the pilot even knowing. In its subtlety lies danger.