Density Altitude

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Safety Pilot: Alpha (again)

Pilot Magazine | Aug 01, 2012

We talk about stalls and slow flight, discuss angle of attack (alpha), attempt to diagram it comprehensively, and yet every year dozens of pilots fail the real-world test and crash as a result of not "getting" it. There have been hundreds of articles, numerous books, and tons of training on the topic. Time to try something different?

IFR Fix: Sorry, no METARs

Article | Jul 20, 2012

For two pilots planning to fly a flamenco artist to a performance in the mountainous Rangeley, Maine, area, the flight time would be brief, but possibly, far from routine, particularly with few weather services in the area.

High-flying pilots press on with Colorado mountain show

Article | Jun 27, 2012

The air is thin over Breckenridge, Colo. Above 10,000 feet msl, Gary Rower's 450-horsepower Stearman will put out less than half its available horsepower. But Rower is preparing to take his act to new heights July 4, with performances billed as "The Highest Show on Earth."

'Racing Aces' win Air Race Classic

Article | Jun 25, 2012

Two Texas pilots who go by the name of the Racing Aces won the 2012 Air Race Classic. Fifty-five teams participated in the all-women's air race that has been an aviation tradition since 1929, when the event was known as the First Women's Air Derby.

President's Position

Pilot Magazine | Jun 01, 2012

After about three weeks of nonstop travel, I found myself in Billings, Montana, with a friend's Aviat Husky A–1B and a very experienced backcountry pilot, Jeanne MacPherson.

Sandia introduces new transponder

Article | May 25, 2012

Looking for a full-featured transponder in a small package? Sandia Aerospace's newly certified STX 165 fits that bill. At fewer than 2 pounds, and only 3.5 by 1.75 by 7 inches, it can fit into almost any panel.

Fly like a fighter: Weird wind

Fly like a fighter | May 07, 2012

An aircraft cleared for takeoff took a little longer on the takeoff roll, but after becoming airborne, it climbed to 30 feet agl and leveled off slightly. Then it stayed at 30 feet agl, passing the departure end of the runway and continuing at that low altitude for at least another half mile.