Icing

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Never Again

Pilot Magazine | Feb 01, 2006

In early April 2003, I flew a Cessna 182 from Omaha to Nashville, a trip I had made several dozen times before. Prior to departure, I had gleaned from The Weather Channel that rain or snow was expected to move across my route in a few days.

Wx Watch: A Perfect Ice Flight

Pilot Magazine | Feb 01, 2006

With a title like this, you're certainly wondering if anything to do with flying around ice can be called "perfect." And strictly speaking, you'd be right. A safety-conscious pilot would never knowingly fly in icing conditions, and we all know why: Even small ice accretions can cause significant decreases in lift, compromised handling characteristics, and increases in stall speed, as well as ruin your ability to climb.

Guide to Member Services

Pilot Magazine | Jan 01, 2006

AOPA ONLINE Aircraft icing Winter flying can be some of the most beautiful. That cold, crisp air makes for smooth flying conditions and the sky is a brilliant, clear blue.

Wx Watch: The Trouble With Zero

Pilot Magazine | Dec 01, 2005

From the earliest days of ground school we've all learned about the temperature ranges associated with icing conditions. Clear icing — that slick, tenacious, transparent coating associated with cumulus clouds — happens most often in the zero-to-minus-10-degree-Celsius range.

Wx Watch: Ice Fighters

Pilot Magazine | Nov 01, 2005

Pilots fortunate enough to have ice-protection systems can become blasé about icing encounters. Brother, is that a mistake! The subject of ice-protection equipment, its capabilities, and correct use is a complicated one — and one that's often neglected in conventional training materials.

Never Again Online: Caught off guard

Article | Oct 01, 2005

We had been trying to make this flight for three weeks now. There was always something that caused us to cancel the trip — an hour-long jaunt from my home airport in New Jersey to Reading Regional/Carl A.

Wx Watch: ADDS Upgrades

Pilot Magazine | Oct 01, 2005

Faithful readers of "Wx Watch" will recall that I've referred to the Aviation Weather Center's (AWC) Aviation Digital Data Service (ADDS) Web site many times in the past. ADDS provides many valuable briefing products, and the AWC is constantly improving the site to make it more valuable and cutting edge.

Pilot Counsel

Pilot Magazine | Aug 01, 2005

AOPA's legal counsel, attorney John S. Yodice, flies a Cessna 310.

Wx Watch: Radar Revolution

Pilot Magazine | Aug 01, 2005

Datalink weather information has revolutionized the way many of us think about weather and deal with in-flight weather decisions. With datalink information such as METARs and TAFs can be called up for studied review — there's no struggling with trying to write as fast as a flight-watch briefer speaks (though flight watch is still the official source for late-breaking weather updates and the sole source of such information for the thousands of us who aren't lucky enough to have datalink service).

Never Again Online: Framing the problem

Article | Jul 01, 2005

My family had begun to enjoy the advantages of general aviation as we used our Cessna 182A for trips to visit relatives away from our home base in Indiana. On this particular weekend in July, we had planned a trip to Michigan to attend a wedding.

Wx Watch: The Eyes Have It

Pilot Magazine | May 01, 2005

Now that thunderstorm season is upon us, it's time to recall the prime directive for guaranteed storm-cell avoidance. It's a very important rule, and one that should be kept firmly in every general aviation pilot's mind, whether he or she is a neophyte or a grizzled high-timer with a logbook bulging with actual instrument time.

Wx Watch: Windwise

Pilot Magazine | Apr 01, 2005

I once did a study of general aviation weather accidents for the AOPA Air Safety Foundation. It had many goals, but one objective was determining which weather phenomenon caused the most accidents.

Wx Watch: Trough Talk

Pilot Magazine | Mar 01, 2005

Troughs are given short shrift in aviation weather courses, but they are major weathermakers. Not so much the troughs occurring at the surface (which are shown by dashed lines, colored brown on colorized surface analysis charts), but those aloft.

AOPA Air Safety Foundation offers 'anti-ice' resources for GA pilots

Article | Mar 01, 2005

AOPA Air Safety Foundation offers 'anti-ice' resources for GA pilots New safety brief focuses on wing contamination It's that time of year again. Frost, snow, and ice are in the forecast, and pilots need to know how to handle these hazards.

Pilot Briefing

Pilot Magazine | Feb 01, 2005

Mooney gets back on its feet Mooney Aerospace Group will be back to focusing on building and selling airplanes after the U.S. Bankruptcy Court for the District of Delaware approved a reorganization plan, company officials said.

Postcards

Pilot Magazine | Feb 01, 2005

Winter flying in Vermont It was the year 1777, and war was exploding across the American colonies, when a tiny corner of New England — a place known for diamond-hard granite and even harder heads — did something so gutsy it surprised both the English and Patriots alike. It declared independence — from everybody.

Wx Watch: Winter Warm Fronts

Pilot Magazine | Feb 01, 2005

Your preflight briefing mentions that a warm front is due to arrive along your planned route of flight. Oh joy, you may think, anticipating balmy temperatures, ice-free skies, and a smooth ride beneath a high overcast that conveniently eliminates that bothersome sun glare.

Wx Watch: Escaping the Frozen Zone

Pilot Magazine | Jan 01, 2005

Two must-see icing Web sites --> Let's say the worst has happened: You're picking up ice. In spite of following a careful preflight weather briefing checklist, in spite of checking all those TAFs, pireps, airmets, and everything pertinent on the many aviation weather Web sites, and despite all these sources indicating an ice-free trip, a layer of ice is beginning to adhere to your airplane.

Never Again

Pilot Magazine | Dec 01, 2004

"Stay out of the ice." This blanket advice has been handed down from instructor to student for as long as pilots have been flying in the clouds. The key to avoiding ice is a proper weather briefing, especially one that includes pilot reports, freezing levels, and cloud layers.

Waypoints

Pilot Magazine | Dec 01, 2004

Editor in Chief Thomas B. Haines rarely regrets canceling a flight.

Wx Watch: Icing on the Web

Pilot Magazine | Nov 01, 2004

How times change. A mere 15 years ago, flight service was the gospel of aviation weather.

Landmark Accidents: Much More Than a Bad Day

Pilot Magazine | Oct 01, 2004

Pilots have to demonstrate mastery of basic airmanship and as they move up the ranks in certificates and ratings, flight checks provide an opportunity to evaluate those skills. Professional pilots flying for charter or the airlines are under closer scrutiny than those who fly for personal reasons.

Pilot Briefing

Pilot Magazine | Feb 01, 2004

Wrights, Rutans follow similar paths On December 17, 2003, the activity at Kill Devil Hills, North Carolina, was a far cry from what it was 100 years ago when the Wright brothers made their first powered flight. This time around there was a large crowd, global media, and, most important, an expectation.

Never Again

Pilot Magazine | Jan 01, 2004

The logbook entry for January 29, 1989, is almost as brief as the flight itself: IFR Green Bay to Oshkosh; ILS 36; ice. On that day, after a family visit in Green Bay, Wisconsin, my wife, Cindy, and I climb into a rented Socata Trinidad for a late afternoon flight back to DuPage Airport near Chicago.

Wx Watch: Airmet-Wise

Pilot Magazine | Jan 01, 2004

Now that we're deep in winter's throes, we've all heard the standard-issue warnings about in-flight icing from flight service or our favorite Internet weather briefing sites. While airmets are mostly well founded, day after day of icing airmets is bound to make some of us doubt we'll ever be able to fly ice-free, or at least not until, say, May or June.