Icing

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Wx Watch: Deadly droplets

Pilot Magazine | Nov 01, 2012

Discovering large-droplet icing--the hard way.

IFR Fix: Ice like a brick

IFR Fix | Oct 19, 2012

When someone survives an icing encounter, the person may describe ice "as large as a house brick on the leading edge, extending back on the wing for one foot."

Never Again

Pilot Magazine | Apr 01, 2012

It was a typical overcast winter morning at Portland International Airport in Oregon, with ceilings running around 1,400 feet agl and reported tops at about 7,000 feet msl. Ground control had just rattled off our clearance to Rogue Valley International in Medford, Oregon, clearing us to 10,000 feet.

Wx Watch: Radar revolution

Pilot Magazine | Apr 01, 2012

Let's face it: When it comes to checking the weather, most of us immediately call up imagery from one or more of the nation's 150 WSR-88D Nexrad Doppler weather radars, especially when thunderstorms threaten.

Iced up and fast

Pilot Magazine | Feb 01, 2012

Winter operations in light jets present a series of problems not encountered during fair weather. Most are related to the chance of encountering in-flight icing, and the associated risks of operating a contaminated aircraft.

Wx Watch: The problem with pireps

Pilot Magazine | Feb 01, 2012

Let's get this out right up front: Pireps are a valuable source of information that can be indispensible for safe flight planning - and can help prevent weather-related accidents and incidents.

Wx Watch: Searching for snowmageddons

Pilot Magazine | Jan 01, 2012

Ever since the huge 2010 East Coast snowstorm dubbed "Snowmaggedon," those living in the busy northeastern coastal corridor states have been extra curious about any nearby winter lows or fronts. Every time an extended-range outlook pops up, we pay extra attention. The temptation is to look for a storm complex somewhere to the west or northwest, on the assumption that weather complexes traditionally move from west to east. That may be true in a general sense, but the worst of the northeast winter snowstorms are actually born in the south.