Crosswind

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FAA deputy administrator a new pilot

Advocacy | Dec 18, 2014

Many student pilots are nervous come checkride day. When you’re a top official at the agency responsible for the safe operation of the largest airspace system in the world, it can add to the pressure.

Aviate, navigate, communicate—and calculate

Apps of the week | Aug 18, 2014

With all of the calculations pilots are required to do for every flight, here's a look at five apps that can help with that process.

TBM Odyssey

Pilot Magazine | Jun 09, 2014

In March, Daher-Socata—manufacturer of the TBM—invited AOPA Pilot along for a one-of-a-kind, epic ferry flight. It involved bringing a flight of four brand-new TBM 900s to the United States, the largest number of TBMs ever imported at one time.

Training Tip: Field length finesse

Article | May 20, 2014

It’s windy today. Whichever runway you select, there will be a crosswind for your takeoffs and for landings.

Michigan high school students get leg up in aviation

Article | Jan 16, 2014

Twenty-one Michigan high school students have completed a class on general aviation, and some have entered flight training.

Fly like a fighter: Tackle snarling crosswinds

Fly like a fighter | Nov 04, 2013

Variable gusting winds can force a runway change on short notice. Pilots should be prepared to switch runways even on short final, as retired Air Force fighter pilot Larry Brown recounts from his training at the Air Force Academy.

Five apps that ease flight planning

Apps of the week | Aug 23, 2013

AOPA members send in recommendations that they say help make all aspects of the flight planning process easier.

: Crosswind Conundrum

Article | Mar 25, 2013

: Crosswind Conundrum Mentoring Tips Crosswind Conundrum Demonstrating a flare for the cross-controlled touchdown It may be a bit sadistic, but one of my favorite spectator sports involves driving to the local airport on a windy day, parking near the runway, and watching inexperienced pilots enter into combat with a blustery crosswind. It is like watching a slapstick comedy.

App roulette

Article | Nov 20, 2012

After throwing a list of apps into an online randomizer, AOPA's Benét J. Wilson takes a look at the top five that the program spit out. You might be surprised by what surfaced.

As 'old school' as it gets

Article | Jul 02, 2012

Old Rhinebeck Aerodrome has for half a century fielded a vintage fleet of pioneer, World War I, and barnstorming aircraft in weekend shows that test the skills of a select group of pilots.

Fly like a Fighter: Crosswind controls

Fly like a fighter | Apr 10, 2012

The Air Force Academy had guidance for the Diamond DA40 of maximum wind for takeoff (26 knots), maximum wind for landing (35 knots), and maximum wind for taxi operations (35 knots). Former Air Force instructor Larry Brown suggests all pilots should all have their own limits for the airplanes they fly.

Never Again Online: Wind effects

Article | Dec 01, 2002

Although flying always fascinated me, as it did lots of us who grew up during World War II, it was not until about 1970 at age 36 that I finally had a chance to get serious about my childhood dream. I moved to Charleston, Illinois, only five miles from the Coles County Memorial.

Changes to Private Pilot Airplane Practical Test Standards, August 2002

Article | Aug 01, 2002

Changes to Private Pilot Airplane Practical Test Standards August 2002 The single biggest change is the reorganization of the Private Pilot PTS to incorporate single-engine land and sea and multiengine land and sea sections into one consolidated document with two sections (single and multiengine), thus reducing the Private Pilot PTS to about half the page count. Some tasks have been reorganized into other areas of operation but have not substantially changed in their requirements or standards.

How Low Can You Go?

Article | Oct 01, 1997

Seen one ILS and you've seen 'em all? Not so fast — there are differences. Like limbo dancers, some go low, some really low, and some really, really low.