Engine Operations

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41 ways to save

Article | Apr 28, 2013

Illustration By A.J. Garces Here are some practical ways to lower flying costs gathered from the personal experiences of AOPA staff pilots, and fellow pilots through AOPA Forums and the AOPA Facebook page.

Club Spotlight: Flying a 182 For the Cost of a 172

Article | Apr 01, 2013

The Paramus Flying Club keeps costs down by flying a Cessna 182 retrofitted with a SMA diesel engine.

Mountain Flying

Article | Mar 25, 2013

AOPA's A Pilot's Guide to Mountain Flying Mountain Flying BY THE AOPA AIR SAFETY FOUNDATION Introduction On behalf of the AOPA Air Safety Foundation staff, thank you for your interest in, quite literally, expanding your horizons by learning the techniques of mountain flying. Operations in the rapidly changing weather conditions and the thin air of the high country differ significantly from normal flight operations.

Ownership: Cold storage

Pilot Magazine | Feb 01, 2013

Keeping your engine happy during winter weather

Fly like a fighter: Fill your brain

Fly like a fighter | Sep 24, 2012

After a high oil-temperature reading, an experienced F-15 pilot learns you can really never know enough.

Cirrus 'chutes to safety off Bahamas, none hurt

Article | Jan 11, 2012

Dr. Richard McGlaughlin was level at 9,500 feet msl when the engine stopped, freezing the propeller over warm Atlantic Ocean water near the island of Andros, Bahamas. Accounts of the successful deployment of the Cirrus SR22's parachute, and the Coast Guard rescue of McGlaughlin and his daughter, Elaine, 25, drew national attention. McGlaughlin recounted part of his experience on the AOPA Forums.

Airframe and Powerplant

Article | Oct 01, 2005

How FAA information helps owners Airplane owners who take an interest in the full scope of ownership — not just in the piloting skills required to plan and complete their flights — learn that the real struggle involved in ownership boils down to information. There's no shortage — it seems as if everyone even remotely involved in aviation fancies himself an expert on some subject and is willing to share his expertise.