First Flight

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North Carolina, Ohio legislators stand behind the Wrights

Article | Oct 24, 2013

North Carolina, Ohio legislators refute the claim that Gustave Whitehead performed the first powered flight.

Outer Banks airports reopen

Article | Oct 18, 2013

The airstrip next to the Wright Brothers National Memorial, and two others on North Carolina's Outer Banks, reopened with the rest of the federal government.

Shutdown closes historic airfield

Article | Oct 10, 2013

The National Park Service shut down the airstrip at the Wright Brothers National Memorial and two other strips on the Outer Banks of North Carolina.

Waypoints: An AirVenture unlike any other

Pilot Magazine | Oct 01, 2013

This summer I attended what is now called EAA AirVenture for the twenty-fourth time—20 in a row.

Briefing: Inverted Jenny stamp to be reissued

Pilot Magazine | Oct 01, 2013

The 24-cent airmail stamp with the inverted Jenny, originally issued May 10, 1918, was scheduled to be reissued as a $2 stamp.

A Passion for Flight

Pilot Magazine | Oct 01, 2013

Mark Baker’s entry into general aviation is classic, quintessential—a textbook case. As a kid he rode his bicycle to the airport and sidled up to the old guys there to hear flying stories while he freely poked around the airplanes, bumming rides when he could.

Proficient Pilot: Speak up!

Pilot Magazine | Oct 01, 2013

On December 28, 1978, United Airlines Flight 173, a McDonnell Douglas DC–8-61 with 189 souls on board, was approaching Oregon’s Portland International Airport.

Pilots: Jack Schulte

Pilot Magazine | Oct 01, 2013

Jack Schulte prefers to fly in summer—and he does so for six months a year. In June, July, and August, he flies a Cessna 182 in the Mountain West from his home at Alpine Airpark in Wyoming.

Proficient Pilot Automation dependency

Pilot Magazine | Sep 01, 2013

Most of us have heard about automation dependency.

Avionics: David comfort

Pilot Magazine | Sep 01, 2013

It is not a stretch to say you can forget you are wearing it. That, said David Clark Co. Executive Vice President Richard M. Urella, is both the “highest compliment” received from testers, and the point.

Quick Look: Citation X

Pilot Magazine | Sep 01, 2013

Cessna says The Citation X is the world’s fastest business jet, capable of flying from New York to Los Angeles in about four hours.

Spreading aviation

Pilot Magazine | Sep 01, 2013

It’s a bright, breezy day at the seaplane base in Lakeland, Florida, the second day of the 2013 annual Sun ’n Fun International Fly-In and Expo. The winds are a little strong—gusting to 20 mph—but the crowds are gathering for the events.

Pilot Briefing Flying to Japan

Pilot Magazine | Sep 01, 2013

The mitsubishi MU–2—the stocky, futuristic-looking high-wing twin turboprop—marks a significant milestone this month: The model first flew in Nagoya, Japan, 50 years ago on September 14.

AOPA rededicates First Flight pilot facility

Article | Aug 19, 2013

Ten years after dedicating a pilot facility at North Carolina’s First Flight Airport (KFFA) in the name of AOPA members, it was rededicated Aug. 19 by AOPA Vice President of the Pilot Information Center Woody Cahall.

The right man for the times

Pilot Magazine | Aug 19, 2013

Craig Fuller’s first bit of advice to the new AOPA president: Get to know the members.

Pilot Briefing: One fast cat

Pilot Magazine | Aug 01, 2013

On a recent visit to Spokane, Washington’s Felts Field, AOPA Pilot got a first look at Northwest Turbine’s latest conversion undergoing certification. The Cougar Baron is a Beechcraft 58P outfitted with a pair of 500-shaft-horsepower Pratt & Whitney PT6A-21 turboprops. Rocket Engineering is doing the certification legwork for partner company Northwest Turbine LLC, which also markets the Royal Turbine conversion of the Beechcraft Duke.

First Look: Pilatus breaks the mold

Pilot Magazine | Aug 01, 2013

Swiss manufacturer Pilatus Aircraft Ltd. has announced a new offering to what had been its all-turboprop line of airplanes. The company’s new, single-pilot-certifiable PC–24 will be a twin-engine, 425-knot “super versatile jet,” and “not a me-too product,” in the words of Pilatus Chairman Oscar Schwenk.

#Oshbash a social media sensation

Article | Aug 01, 2013

If ever there were an exception to the etiquette rulebook on use of smartphones in public, it would probably be for tweeting , texting, videoing, or photographing a social media tweetup. But before the July 31 Airplanista 2013 #Oshbash Awards and Meetup at EAA AirVenture in Oshkosh, Wis., attendees chatted in person.

Proficient Pilot: Interruption of routine

Pilot Magazine | Aug 01, 2013

Prior to taking off from the dirt “airstrip” serving the Londolozi Game Reserve in South Africa, the manager there had requested that I treat the guests to a low pass over the lodge, which was nestled in a ravine near the departure end of the runway. Not one to pass up such an invitation, I enthusiastically agreed.

Quick Look: Gulfstream II

Pilot Magazine | Aug 01, 2013

The Gulfstream II (G-1159) was developed in the mid-1960s by Grumman Aircraft as a successor to its Gulfstream I twin turboprop, the original purpose-built business airplane. On May 5, 1965, the production go-ahead was given for the $4 million, sweptwing, 19-passenger jet, which was powered by two aft-mounted Rolls-Royce Spey Mk 511-8 turbofans.

One-on-one type training

Pilot Magazine | Aug 01, 2013

The vast majority of my training in turbine airplanes has been simulator-based, and conducted at facilities run by CAE/Simuflite, FlightSafety International, CAE, and Simcom. The training was excellent, with a daily mix of formal classroom sessions and time spent in the simulators.

Never Again: Tumble in the desert

Pilot Magazine | Aug 01, 2013

My private pilot training took place nearly 36 years ago in a Cessna 150 at Ryan Field near Tucson, Arizona. No one can exaggerate the benefits of training as a student pilot in the Arizona desert’s persistent severe-clear conditions. However, even the perfect training environment could not prevent a nearly disastrous event that occurred during one of my solo cross-country flights.

Cessna TTx enters GA fleet

Article | Jul 01, 2013

The Cessna TTx is a piston speedster bearing a closer resemblance to a fighter than a business flier, as AOPA Editor in Chief Thomas B. Haines noted. Cessna announced July 1 that the first production TTx aircraft were delivered at the end of June.

Mentor Matters: Runway analysis

Pilot Magazine | Jul 01, 2013

In a previous article, I discussed the fallacy that jet aircraft may not legally depart IFR unless able to maintain any specified departure procedure (DP) climb gradient following the loss of an engine. While many pilots widely believe this true, the AIM is clear in stating that DPs assume normal aircraft performance with all engines operating.

Pilot Briefing: New York to Tokyo in two hours

Pilot Magazine | Jul 01, 2013

If Richard Lugg has his way, the next generation of supersonic civilian aircraft will shoot through the sky powered by engines that turn out a massive electrical charge, much of it converted into thrust with megawatts left over to silence the sonic boom.