Thunderstorms

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The Bonanza goes to war

Pilot Magazine | Aug 06, 2014

Few students of the Vietnam War know much about the QU–22B Pave Eagle, the most unusual Bonanza you’ve never seen. Well, it’s mostly Bonanza; the highly modified airframe has a number of unique parts. Only 27 were built, plus six predecessor YQU–22A models.

Weather Watch: Gusts and squalls

Pilot Magazine | Jul 31, 2014

A gust front at EAA’s AirVenture in 2011, about to attack AOPA’s tent site.

Safety

Article | Jun 16, 2014

Thunderstorms cause relatively few accidents – on average, about five per year – but 75 percent of them are fatal.

Training Tip: Thunderstorm in sight

Article | Jun 10, 2014

Does this scenario justify deviating from the airport’s normal calm-wind-runway operations?

IFR Fix: 'No useful correlation'

IFR Fix | Jun 09, 2014

When sizing up a thunderstorm from a distance, what are the most important visual aspects?

Datalink dangers

Pilot Magazine | Jun 05, 2014

It was all so subtle. My inadvertent thunderstorm penetration took place so slowly that it didn’t fulfill my preconceived notion of a thunderstorm encounter—meaning one minute you’re OK, the next minute you’re deep in chaos.

Flying the Weather: T-storm Toolbox

Video | Jun 05, 2014

AOPA President Mark Baker and AOPA Foundation President Bruce Landsberg discuss some of the strategies they used to navigate around thunderstorms during a recent flight.

Flying the Weather: T-storm Toolbox

Video | Jun 04, 2014

AOPA President Mark Baker and AOPA Foundation President Bruce Landsberg discuss some of the strategies they used to navigate around thunderstorms during a recent flight. Be sure to watch the upcoming Storm Week webinar for more information.

Training Tip: Volatile virga

Article | Jun 03, 2014

Virga can be picturesque to behold, but don’t let its benign appearance breed complacency.

Training Tip: 'Castles in the air'

Article | May 27, 2014

The clouds’ vertical development has already gone beyond what pilots and meteorologists refer to as “fair weather cumulus” or “summer puffies.”