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AOPA Air Safety Foundation Safety Brief -- Braking Action Reports

Article | Mar 25, 2013

Safety Brief Cold Facts: Braking Action Reports Have you ever tuned in the ATIS at your favorite airport only to hear " ... braking action fair" and wondered what exactly it meant? These wintertime reports highlight one of the hazards of winter flying — taxiways and runways covered in snow, ice and slush.

Mountain Ways

Article | Mar 25, 2013

AOPA's A Pilot's Guide to Mountain Flying Coping with mountain weather BY THOMAS A. HORNE Why do so many weather-related accidents happen near hilly or mountainous regions? Three reasons come to mind.

ASF - Aircraft Deicing/Anti-icing Equipment

Article | Mar 25, 2013

Aircraft Deicing and Anti-icing Equipment The resources listed below are provided as additional information to the AOPA Air Safety Foundation's Aircraft Deicing and Anti-icing Equipment Safety Advisor. The links below provide information on icing accident statistics, weather flying strategies, certification of aircraft, and suggestions on how to tell if your aircraft is approved for flight in known icing conditions.

Weather Curiosity - Clouds as Sign Posts

Article | Mar 25, 2013

Wx Watch Among the Clouds What's it like in there? BY THOMAS A. HORNE (From AOPA Pilot, March 1997.) We should all be weather-watchers, and not just on the days we plan to fly.

Weather Curiosity - Flight Preparations

Article | Mar 25, 2013

The Weather Briefing --> Weather on the Web The Internet is a valuable flight-planning tool BY JACK WILLIAMS (From Flight Training, January 2002.) Figure 1: Detailed North American surface analysis chart Figure 2: A simplified surface analysis chart Figure 3: A simplified weather depiction chart Figure 4: Part of a NWS weather depiction chart A few minutes of surfing the Web can usually give a pilot a pretty good idea about whether going flying today is a good idea. Looking at a few weather charts might make it obvious that the weather where you want to fly is so bad that it's not worth the trouble of obtaining a formal preflight weather briefing.

Weather Curiosity - Fronts

Article | Mar 25, 2013

The Weather Never Sleeps Storming The Front How Air Masses Wage Meteorological War BY JACK WILLIAMS (From Flight Training, May 1996.) Meteorologists use the war-like term fronts for one of the atmosphere's key weather makers, because Norwegian scientists developed the theory of fronts during World War I when headlines screamed about battles along the Western Front. The name seemed appropriate for the zone between contrasting air masses.

Stability

Article | Mar 25, 2013

The Weather Never Sleeps Stability How bubbles of air can upset the atmosphere BY JACK WILLIAMS (From Flight Training, November 1996.) Air stability is one of those theoretical-sounding subjects that pilots should learn for good, practical reasons. This knowledge helps you make sense of preflight weather forecasts and actual weather you encounter in flight.

Thunderstorms

Article | Mar 25, 2013

The Weather Never Sleeps --> Thunderstorms A Thunderstorm Unites Just About Every Hazard Known To Aviation! BY THE FAA (From Flight Training, February 1994.) Annually, and prior to the start of the season, we publish an issue of the Air Traffic Bulletin to focus your attention on the upcoming thunderstorm season and to remind all controllers and specialists of the hazardous weather associated with it. The more we understand the severe atmospheric hazards associated with thunderstorms, the better position we are in to aid the pilot in avoiding these hazards.

ASF - Weather

Article | Mar 25, 2013

Weather and Flight Experience Severe Ice in Pennsylvania My encounter began one March morning in western Pennsylvania. I was a Part 135 pilot in a PA-32 and PA-34 and that morning I was to fly to DET to pick up cargo in the '6' and return to AFJ.

ASF - Weather

Article | Mar 25, 2013

Weather and Flight Experience Mountain Flying in Turbulence Tickets to a Seahawks game in hand, myself and three others climbed into the Cessna 206 for a quick trip up to Seattle from our homes in central Oregon. The weather was locked into a typical pattern, southwesterly winds pushing wet clouds up against the Cascades and up into the colder air aloft, making the perfect conditions for some really spectacular icing.