Cancer

General Cancer Guidelines

The FAA considers certain cancers to pose higher risk for sudden or subtle incapacitation based upon possible metastatic disease (spreading of the cancer to other parts of the body).  Because there are so many different types of cancers, from basal cell skin cancer to aggressive metastatic brain cancers, each case is reviewed individually before a certification decision is made. 

With few exceptions, the FAA considers all types of cancer to be disqualifying, and require a special issuance medical certificate.  To be considered for a special issuance, the FAA will require the following information:

  • Hospital Admission History and Physical; 
  • Discharge Summary; 
  • Surgical report;
  • Pathology report; 
  • Results of diagnostic tests.  The FAA may need to review “raw data” results (videos, CD’s, scans, or tracings) so if you have those, send them along. 
  • Blood lab reports (if done)  
  • current status report from the treating physician outlining your current condition, medications (dosage and frequency), treatment plan, and prognosis.

The information should be mailed to the FAA, either overnight or registered, return receipt requested. Include your full name, address, date of birth and Social Security number (if you report your SS# on the medical application) on each page and send to:

FAA Aerospace Medical Certification Division
AAM 300
Civil Aerospace Medical Institute
6700 South MacArthur Blvd
Oklahoma City, OK  73169

We suggest you mail the information yourself to the FAA.  When your case is cleared, the FAA will mail your medical certificate to you, along with an authorization letter that explains the procedure for future recertification.  This authorization may also include an AME Assisted Special Issuance (AASI) that will allow the AME to recertify annually you in the office. 

08/13