IAOPA

Items per page   10 | 25 | 50 | 100
21 to 26 of 26 results

President's Position

Pilot Magazine | Jan 01, 2005

Phil Boyer is the president of the International Council of Aircraft Owner and Pilot Associations. Thanksgiving Day in America is meant to be a time to offer thanks with family and friends, and symbolizes the start of a holiday season for many of us.

President's Position

Pilot Magazine | Nov 01, 2003

AOPA President Phil Boyer also serves as the president of IAOPA. "The FAA promotes aviation safety in the interest of the American public by regulating and overseeing the civil aviation industry to make sure that the United States is operating a safe aviation industry." So begins the regulatory page of the FAA Web site.

President's Position

Pilot Magazine | May 01, 2002

AOPA President Phil Boyer also serves as president of the International Council of Aircraft Owner and Pilot Associations. The International Council of Aircraft Owner and Pilot Associations (IAOPA) celebrated its fortieth anniversary in February.

Hangar Talk

Pilot Magazine | Feb 01, 2002

After many years of trial and error learning as a military, corporate, and charter pilot and flight instructor, Professional Aviation Inc. President and Secretary General of the International Council of Aircraft Owner and Pilot Associations John J.

President's Position

Pilot Magazine | Nov 01, 2000

This column is being written as I return from a trip to Edinburgh, Scotland—not to play golf, but to attend the Twentieth World Assembly of the International Council of Aircraft Owner and Pilot Associations (IAOPA). Every two years, the 54 affiliates of this organization are invited to participate in a conference that is designed to share ideas, look ahead to international policies and regulations that could affect general aviation around the world, and network with the officers and delegates of AOPA affiliates in other countries.

President's Position

Pilot Magazine | Dec 01, 1997

Imagine general aviation airports that on weekends don't allow touch and goes and that limit departures to aircraft going cross-country only. Or, picture our familiar single-engine Pipers and Cessnas with huge exterior mufflers and exhaust pipes stretching under their fuselages.