Now taking off: Flight training apps

June 20, 2014

Student pilots in the different phases of flight training need all the help they can get, and aviation companies are happy to help by offering apps that cover topics from studying the FAR/AIM to mastering takeoffs and landings. These are not endorsements of any app.

Sporty’s FAR/AIM ($9.99 in iTunes)—This iPhone/iPad app includes the basic information from the federal aviation regulations and Aeronautical Information Manual. Users can highlight and bookmark passages for quick retrieval or can study content based on current training. For example, a private pilot working on an instrument rating can filter the regulations and content applicable to flying IFR.  

Holding Pattern Trainer ($3.99 in iTunes and Google Play)—This smartphone app allows users in instrument training to master holding pattern entries on their device. The app creates scenarios where the pilot has to choose the most appropriate entry to a hold based on position and the ATC holding instruction. It also features a holding tutorial so users can learn how to choose the best holding entry quickly and easily.

PilotWorkshops – Pilot Proficiency Training (free in iTunes)—This AOPA Premier Partner’s iPhone/iPad app offers workshops on a range of training in topics including ATC communications, nontowered airports, takeoffs and landings, night flying, and using checklists. The first 20 workshops are free; after that, they cost $2.99 each or $199.99 for the entire library.

Private Pilot Course - Ground Portion ($29.99 in iTunes and Google Play)—This app, optimized for smartphones, gives student pilots insight into what happens on the ground portion of your FAA private pilot practical test. It includes more than an hour of video reenacting an oral checkride with an instructor to see what to expect on your private pilot practical test.

Takeoffs and Landings Made Easy ($29.99 in iTunes)—This iPhone/iPad app from King Schools features live-action video that puts student pilots in the cockpit, at the controls, giving them the sight picture needed for approaches and flares. Users will also learn how to see at a glance whether they’re too high, too low, or off to one side, and also learn how to recover from a botched flare or touchdown.

Thanks to everyone who has sent in Google Play apps. Please continue to sbubmit them, along with Windows apps, here. See a complete list of apps reviewed here.

Benét Wilson

Benét J. Wilson | AOPA eNewsletter and Social Media Editor

AOPA eNewsletter and Social Media Editor Benét J. Wilson joined AOPA in 2011. She is working on her private pilot certificate.