Overhaul

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Pilot Products: Heavy tugs, cool air

Pilot Magazine | Jul 01, 2011

Redline Sidewinder Who: Redline SidewinderWhat: Battery Operated aircraft tugWhere: www.aircraftspruce.comWhy: Because you need one tug, not five that don't workCost: $1,600 Pros: Well-built is an understatement Battery means no more small-engine repair Can be folded and stowed in the baggage compartment Cons: Somewhat difficult to put on Heavy If you are like some aircraft owners, you have a collection of tugs sitting broken, half-forgotten in the corner of your hangar. That's because for some reason the idea of tugs attracts home inventors and quasi entrepreneurs almost as much as aviation flashlights.

Prime time for the Jabiru

Pilot Magazine | Jun 01, 2011

With the pattern at Avon Park, Florida, clear of traffic, I taxied the Jabiru J230-SP light sport aircraft (LSA) onto the runway behind an older Cessna 172 carrying AOPA Senior Photographer Mike Fizer. Despite letting the Cessna start its takeoff roll and reach rotation speed prior to releasing the hand brake, the 120-horsepower Jabiru quickly caught the 160-horsepower Cessna on the climbout and could barely stay behind it. The Jabiru was a hawk that had just seen lunch—the 172.

GA Serves America: Tennessee time machine

Pilot Magazine | May 01, 2011

James Dillard takes the call from a factory manager in rural Mississippi. The manager, who oversees production of parts used in household furniture, tells Dillard, “I have an entire third shift who doesn’t know if they’re working tonight.

AOPA 2011 Crossover Classic Sweeps

Pilot Magazine | Mar 01, 2011

One down, three more to go. Work packages for AOPA's 2011 Crossover Classic sweepstakes Cessna 182, that is. Those of you who've followed our sweepstakes restoration projects in the past know how these very substantial projects progress through four basic stages: engine and propeller; avionics; interior; and paint.

AOPA 2011 Crossover Classic Sweeps

Pilot Magazine | Feb 01, 2011

One down, three more to go. Work packages for AOPA's 2011 Crossover Classic sweepstakes Cessna 182, that is. Those of you who've followed our sweepstakes restoration projects in the past know how these very substantial projects progress through four basic stages: engine and propeller; avionics; interior; and paint.

A lucky find

Pilot Magazine | Jan 01, 2011

Photography by Mike Fizer If Pat Smith’s V-tail Bonanza were to be purchased today in the same condition it was in 1996 when he bought it, it would have a base price of $85,000, according to a Vref estimate, but back then it cost $71,500; it had been newly refurbished by one of the nation’s busiest Bonanza repair shops. There was new paint, a new interior, an engine overhaul by another company, and a rebuilt nose gear because of an accident in the Dallas area.

First flights

Pilot Magazine | Jan 01, 2011

Whew! After a hunt lasting two months, we finally found our 2011 sweepstakes airplane. The Crossover Classic-to-be is a 1974 Cessna 182P; it lived at the Middletown, Ohio, Regional Airport (MWO) and belonged to Thomas C. Wortley, a local businessman. As a restoration project, this airplane is near perfect, with just 1,754.6 total hours on the airframe, long-range fuel tanks, a recently overhauled engine, and an original Cessna/ARC instrument panel, with two exceptions: Garmin¿s GMA 340 audio panel and SL30 nav/com.

Cirrus SR22T

Pilot Magazine | Jul 01, 2010

The new Cirrus SR22T is the most obvious response to date by an aircraft manufacturer to the concerns of potential new aircraft buyers about the future of leaded avgas. Officials at Teledyne Continental Motors say the new -K model of the TSIO-550 engine on the SR22T gives Cirrus buyers a path to a lead-free future.

Letters

Pilot Magazine | Jun 01, 2010

Jill W. Tallman’s article raises the question “Are self-certified pilots unsafe?” (“Fun to Fly Sweepstakes: ‘A Little Bit Different,’” April 2010 AOPA Pilot).

Frugal Flyer: Free engine overhaul

Pilot Magazine | Apr 01, 2010

A Watching a fellow pilot heft several five-gallon cans of auto fuel onto the wing of his experimental airplane and pour the contents into the fuel tanks, I couldn’t resist the urge to tease him about being such a cheapskate. After all, this was a Russian-made aerobat that cost more than $150,000.