Aviation Medical Examiner

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Answers for Pilots: Blood pressure

Article | Feb 01, 2011

In the United States, 74 million people - one out of three adults - have been diagnosed with hypertension (high blood pressure). The causes are almost as diverse as the individuals affected: age, race, weight, and lifestyle top the list. Pilots, unfortunately, don't escape the statistics, and an airman with uncontrolled hypertension may have a problem at the next FAA medical exam. Hypertension, however, doesn't have to ground you. Learn what you need to do to keep flying in this month's "Answers for Pilots."

Fly Well

Article | Dec 01, 2010

In 1949 Jerry Lewis, Tony Curtis, and Janet Leigh made a short movie titled How to Smuggle a Hernia Across the Border. Why? I have no idea.

Answers for Pilots: Back to school

Article | Sep 01, 2010

As the calendar rolls into September, colleges across the country commence fall classes and students turn their attention to their studies. For pilots, basic and advanced flight training, and proficiency flights traverse the academic calendar, but if you are looking for career opportunities in the aviation industry, there are a variety of opportunities to add an aviation degree to your list of qualifications.

Fly Well

Pilot Magazine | Jun 01, 2010

"Sometimes, all I need is the air that I breathe and to love you," sang The Hollies in 1972. Nice sentiments, but wrong. You need air - not sometimes, all of the time. Many pilots scuba dive, always descending with a carefully checked tank, but many ascend without oxygen. Federal Aviation Regulation 91.211 states that a pilot of an unpressurized aircraft shall not operate from 12,500 to 14,000 feet for longer than 30 minutes without supplemental oxygen. Above 14,000 feet, oxygen has to be used by the crew, and above 15,000 feet it must be provided for everyone aboard.

Fly Well

Pilot Magazine | May 01, 2010

"Sometimes, all I need is the air that I breathe and to love you," sang The Hollies in 1972. Nice sentiments, but wrong. You need air - not sometimes, all of the time. Many pilots scuba dive, always descending with a carefully checked tank, but many ascend without oxygen. Federal Aviation Regulation 91.211 states that a pilot of an unpressurized aircraft shall not operate from 12,500 to 14,000 feet for longer than 30 minutes without supplemental oxygen. Above 14,000 feet, oxygen has to be used by the crew, and above 15,000 feet it must be provided for everyone aboard.

Answers for Pilots: Spring Allergies

Article | Apr 01, 2010

Trees budding, temperatures rising, sunshine stretching into the evening - it must be Spring! It's great being on this side of the summer solstice, enjoying the opportunity to be outdoors, again, especially when it involves doing some flying after work.

Fly Well

Pilot Magazine | Feb 01, 2010

“The heart is the only broken instrument that works,” said T.E. Kalem, former writer for Time magazine, and on Valentine’s Day, surrounded by images of love, we tend to focus on the emotional side of our biological fuel pump.

Fly Well

Pilot Magazine | Dec 01, 2009

You are one in a million. Well, figuratively speaking, anyway.

Dr COPTR

Pilot Magazine | Sep 01, 2009

Residents of Tangier Island don’t need a written schedule to know when the doctor is available. They know it by heart.

The doctor is in

Pilot Magazine | Jun 01, 2009

The shrill sound of the pager pierced the quiet moment of early morning solitude in the office as I attempted to catch up on the necessities of being a flight physician. Reviewing the list of return phone calls to make, studying the upcoming patient visits, and signing electronic medical notes was being interrupted again.

President's Position: The airman medical

Pilot Magazine | Sep 01, 2008

AOPA President Phil Boyer became a private pilot in 1967. What’s the most under-utilized resource AOPA offers its members? Without a doubt, it’s our medical certification services.

Medically Speaking: Never Give Up

Pilot Magazine | Aug 01, 2008

You sit there in the examining room, blinking your eyes in disbelief at what the doctor in the white coat just told you—even as the words reverberate in your ears. “I’m afraid that you do not meet the requirements for a third class medical certificate.” For many pilots, the aviation medical examiner’s words come as a surprise.

America's Airports: In the Conch Republic

Pilot Magazine | Feb 01, 2008

The week leading up to Christmas is a quiet time in Key West, Florida. “The calm before the storm,” Joshua Pavia calls it.

Cross-Country at Record-Setting Speed

Pilot Magazine | Nov 01, 2007

My world record Put yourself in aviation history By Alton K. Marsh Bruce Bohannon, the guy who won 30 world records aboard his Exxon Flyin' Tiger, once told me he had seriously considered breaking my world speed record.

Answers for Pilots

Pilot Magazine | Sep 01, 2007

Controlling your blood pressure Nearly one-third of the adult population in the United States has high blood pressure (properly called hypertension) according to the American Heart Association, and, amazingly, more than half of those afflicted are doing nothing to control it. For pilots, keeping blood pressure controlled is essential in order to qualify for medical certificates.

Safety Pilot Landmark Accidents: Into the Abyss

Pilot Magazine | Sep 01, 2007

"Black hole" approaches describe runways that have no lights surrounding the airport and thus are susceptible to pilot misjudgment on height above the ground. They have been the destination for many an accident flight.

AOPA Project Pilot

Pilot Magazine | Jun 01, 2007

Where everyone mentors each other His face probably looks familiar. Is it Dexter Reilly? Jack Burton? Wyatt Earp? Snake Plissken? Captain Ron? Yes, all of the above.

Member Guide

Article | Jan 01, 2007

Refine your radio communication knowledge at free seminar The AOPA Air Safety Foundation's latest safety seminar, Say It Right! Radio Communication in Today's Airspace, will increase your communication know-how with practical tips on communicating in today's airspace. You'll also get straightforward advice on common pitfalls for VFR and IFR operations, communicating in an emergency, and coping with challenges at both towered and nontowered airports.

Answers for Pilots

Pilot Magazine | Jan 01, 2007

AOPA's TurboMedical can help The aviation medical certification process can be a foreign concept to most general aviation pilots. With a visit to the aviation medical examiner (AME) occurring only once every few years, it's no wonder pilots get trapped by the process.

President's Position

Pilot Magazine | Oct 01, 2006

Since Phil Boyer became AOPA's president in 1991, membership has grown more than 25 percent, to 408,000 members. I began using AOPA as a resource many years ago, but it wasn't until I took the helm of the association in 1991 that I discovered the extent of knowledge and experience available to me and any member of the association.

- Oshkosh 2006 Other News

Article | Jul 27, 2006

AOPA Online -- Oshkosh 2006 Other News Extended-time medical certificates, GA-friendly FAA funding, administrator promises FAA Administrator Marion Blakey promised pilots longer-running medicals and a new FAA funding system that won't "stifle the GA community," during her annual speech at Oshkosh Wednesday. Blakey said the agency has started rulemaking to extend the duration of third class medicals for pilots under age 40 from three to five years.

Medically Speaking

Pilot Magazine | Jun 01, 2006

Vertigo grounds a seasoned pilot, but he eventually settles back into the captain's seat Frank Kennedy, a 10,000-plus-hour flight instructor, Atlas Air cargo pilot, and former Marine A4 and AV-8 Harrier jock, had always been the consummate practitioner of unusual attitudes. Comfortable in any airborne orientation, he'd never had a problem figuring out how to put the blue side back in its place.

Guide to Member Services

Pilot Magazine | Feb 01, 2006

Member lapel pins AOPA recognizes members who have been with the association and provided continuous support for general aviation for five, 10, 20, 25, 30, 40, 50, and 60 years with distinctive lapel pins. (The five-, 25-, and 60-year pins are new this year.) These service pins are mailed each month as AOPA identifies members who have reached these membership milestones.

President's Position

Pilot Magazine | Nov 01, 2005

AOPA President Phil Boyer is general aviation's spokesman in Washington. Earlier in the year this column discussed the pressure from the Department of Transportation, Federal Aviation Administration, and airlines to change the way our federal air traffic control (ATC) system is financed ("President's Position: FAA Funding," June Pilot).