Special Issuance Medical

Items per page   10 | 25 | 50 | 100
71 to 80 of 105 results

Fly Well

Pilot Magazine | Jul 01, 2010

"Sometimes, all I need is the air that I breathe and to love you," sang The Hollies in 1972. Nice sentiments, but wrong. You need air - not sometimes, all of the time. Many pilots scuba dive, always descending with a carefully checked tank, but many ascend without oxygen. Federal Aviation Regulation 91.211 states that a pilot of an unpressurized aircraft shall not operate from 12,500 to 14,000 feet for longer than 30 minutes without supplemental oxygen. Above 14,000 feet, oxygen has to be used by the crew, and above 15,000 feet it must be provided for everyone aboard.

Member Guide

Pilot Magazine | Jul 01, 2010

Answers For Pilots: Certain antidepressants are now FAA-allowed Most of us who’ve lived awhile have gone through some turbulent times—relationships gone sour, a loved one’s illness or death, or a really bad financial break. We get knocked down, shake it off, and get up to carry on, again.

DOT reports on medical information security, data-sharing

Advocacy | Jul 01, 2010

A report from the Department of Transportation's Office of Inspector General has identified 15 recommendations for improving the security of airmen's medical information and the process of identifying pilots with current medical certificates who are receiving disability pay.

Answers for Pilots: Cheer Up!

Article | Jul 01, 2010

If you mention a life-crisis to a physician, he or she usually suggests you consider taking an antidepressant to help you cope with it. While thousands of non-pilots have found some help working through their tough times by taking prescribed antidepressants, pilots could not without invalidating their airman medical certificates, since the FAA had not (until recently) allowed the use of any antidepressants for any condition. But now, it's a different story.

Fly Well

Pilot Magazine | Jun 01, 2010

"Sometimes, all I need is the air that I breathe and to love you," sang The Hollies in 1972. Nice sentiments, but wrong. You need air - not sometimes, all of the time. Many pilots scuba dive, always descending with a carefully checked tank, but many ascend without oxygen. Federal Aviation Regulation 91.211 states that a pilot of an unpressurized aircraft shall not operate from 12,500 to 14,000 feet for longer than 30 minutes without supplemental oxygen. Above 14,000 feet, oxygen has to be used by the crew, and above 15,000 feet it must be provided for everyone aboard.

Fly Well

Pilot Magazine | May 01, 2010

"Sometimes, all I need is the air that I breathe and to love you," sang The Hollies in 1972. Nice sentiments, but wrong. You need air - not sometimes, all of the time. Many pilots scuba dive, always descending with a carefully checked tank, but many ascend without oxygen. Federal Aviation Regulation 91.211 states that a pilot of an unpressurized aircraft shall not operate from 12,500 to 14,000 feet for longer than 30 minutes without supplemental oxygen. Above 14,000 feet, oxygen has to be used by the crew, and above 15,000 feet it must be provided for everyone aboard.

Fly Well

Pilot Magazine | Feb 01, 2010

“The heart is the only broken instrument that works,” said T.E. Kalem, former writer for Time magazine, and on Valentine’s Day, surrounded by images of love, we tend to focus on the emotional side of our biological fuel pump.

AOPA Action

Pilot Magazine | Oct 01, 2009

AOPA, EAA formalize collaborative efforts With the letters “EAA” emblazoned by a skywriter across a crisp blue Wisconsin sky, the presidents of the world’s two largest aviation associations signed a memorandum of understanding that harnesses the power of the two organizations to bring about improvements to general aviation. Under the agreement, EAA and AOPA pledged to support each other’s efforts to promote, protect, and expand the general aviation community.

Answers for Pilots: Healthier Choices

Article | Jul 01, 2009

AOPA Air Safety Foundation’s 2008 Nall Report, which details general aviation accidents, trends, and factors for 2007, states that pilot-related accidents accounted for about three-quarters of both total and fatal general aviation accidents in 2007. Each of the pilots involved in these accidents made a decision, or a series of decisions, that culminated in an accident.

The doctor is in

Pilot Magazine | Jun 01, 2009

The shrill sound of the pager pierced the quiet moment of early morning solitude in the office as I attempted to catch up on the necessities of being a flight physician. Reviewing the list of return phone calls to make, studying the upcoming patient visits, and signing electronic medical notes was being interrupted again.