Wind and Gusts

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Flying Together

Pilot Magazine | Jul 01, 2006

Marital navigation aloft Taking my husband and children flying after obtaining my pilot certificate and instrument rating years ago used to be effortless and fun. Whether it was doing a few steep turns over our sheep pasture or popping over the mountains to see grandma's house, we enjoyed the freedom of being airborne together.

Trout Raining From the Skies

Pilot Magazine | May 01, 2006

My wife, Lorraine, and I were enjoying a quiet day of fishing on a remote Maine trout pond last fall when my ears perked up at the sound of a light airplane. As a pilot, I couldn't resist craning around for a look.

Wx Watch: ASOS Basics

Pilot Magazine | Apr 01, 2006

Since its introduction in the 1980s, automated weather observing stations have become standard equipment at many airports around the world. These include the federally funded ASOS (automated surface observation system) and the federal- and/or state-funded AWOS (automated weather observation system) instrument suites.

Landmark Accidents: Down and Locked

Article | Dec 01, 2005

Pilots, like doctors, should take the Hippocratic oath: When faced with an emergency, don't make the situation worse — do no harm. It sometimes happens that we turn a minor mishap into a major accident.

Pilotage

Pilot Magazine | Sep 01, 2005

Aviation journalist Mark R. Twombly writes from South Florida.

Waypoints

Pilot Magazine | Aug 01, 2005

Editor in Chief Thomas B. Haines uses his Beechcraft Bonanza for personal and business flights.

Wx Watch: Squall-Line Lowdown

Pilot Magazine | Jul 01, 2005

It's challenging enough to cope with "garden variety" thunderstorms, what with all the extra preflight weather research and in-flight monitoring that safe flying demands in the convective season. To all that, factor in other brands of convective activity that require as much, or more, vigilance (see "Safety Pilot Landmark Accidents: Midlevel Mayhem," page 66).

Wind, Weather, and Passengers

Pilot Magazine | Jun 01, 2005

In flying, much is made of personal limitations. This is especially true of low-time pilots and newly certificated instrument pilots with regard to flying solo in instrument meteorological conditions (IMC).

Wx Watch: Windwise

Pilot Magazine | Apr 01, 2005

I once did a study of general aviation weather accidents for the AOPA Air Safety Foundation. It had many goals, but one objective was determining which weather phenomenon caused the most accidents.

Never Again Online: Yes, overconfidence!

Article | Oct 01, 2004

As I remember, it was a Friday afternoon in early October when I looked skyward over Van Nuys Airport in California. Weekends were open since my wife and son were still back East, busy selling our home on Long Island, New York.

Letters

Pilot Magazine | Oct 01, 2004

The Great Airplane Bank Robbery This is in response to "The Great Airplane Bank Robbery" article in your August issue. I have been telling that story to people for 35 years and have encountered some who knew of Bugs and his escapades.

Waypoints

Pilot Magazine | Oct 01, 2004

Editor in chief Thomas B. Haines enjoys the challenge of instrument flying but would rather watch thunderstorms from his front porch than from the cockpit.

The Flap About Flaps

Pilot Magazine | Aug 01, 2004

As Shakespeare didn't say, "To flap or partial flap, that is the question." Flap usage becomes a matter of experience and, therefore, personal opinion. That may be why, over the years, pilots of single-engine airplanes have hotly debated the issue.

Near misses with boomers

Article | May 01, 2004

Bruce Landsberg, Air Safety Foundation executive director, has spent years studying Thor's handiwork. It's thunderstorm season once again and throughout the magazine you will see plenty of references to why messing around in the big clouds is a bad idea (see "Wx Watch: Storm Season Insights," page 123).

Never Again Online: Gravity waves: A pilot's perspective

Article | Apr 01, 2004

As pilots, we know quite a bit about many things. For instance, while we are not mechanics, we understand our aircraft's systems.

Answers for Pilots

Pilot Magazine | Mar 01, 2004

Meeting March head-on The pilot who can meet the winds of March (or any other time of year, for that matter) with some planning will be the pilot who flies with confidence come what may, says Jim Knight, AOPA senior aviation technical specialist. "Pilots typically hibernate during the winter months unless they're in Florida or California, someplace nice all year round," says Knight.

Never Again

Pilot Magazine | Feb 01, 2004

I awoke that cold and blustery February morning anticipating my upcoming flight in an airplane in which I had just been checked out. Only a few months earlier I had earned my private pilot certificate in a Piper Warrior.

Wx Watch: The Wright Weather

Pilot Magazine | Dec 01, 2003

"Success four flights Thursday morning all against twenty one mile wind started from Level with engine power alone average speed through air thirty-one miles longest 57 second inform press home Christmas Orville Wright." This famous century-old telegram from the Wright brothers to their father in Dayton may have been the world's first informal METAR. Right up front, where it ranks in importance, Orville emphasizes the wind's role in the historic first flights.

Proficient Pilot

Pilot Magazine | Nov 01, 2003

Retired TWA captain Barry Schiff holds all seven instructor ratings. AOPA inaugurated Project Pilot in 1994.

Never Again

Pilot Magazine | Nov 01, 2003

"Brainard Tower, this is Grumman Tiger Two-Eight-Eight-Five-Seven, 11 miles southwest, inbound with Alpha." (Information Alpha at Hartford, Connecticut's Hartford-Brainard Airport was reporting winds at 240 degrees and 10 to 15 knots, traffic using Runway 20.) Not too bad, I thought to myself, a slight crab at the onset maybe, and then a little right aileron with left rudder. "Grumman Tiger Two-Eight-Eight-Five-Seven, report entering a downwind for Runway 20," the controller said.

Hanging Around

Pilot Magazine | Sep 01, 2003

I'll never fly again without an altimeter. Late last summer my wife and the in-laws and I rented a house on North Carolina's Outer Banks for a week.

Waypoints

Pilot Magazine | Sep 01, 2003

Editor in Chief Thomas B. Haines has made the trip to Oshkosh more than a dozen times in every manner of airplane.

Airframe and Powerplant

Pilot Magazine | Jul 01, 2003

100 years of airplane engine progress Charlie Taylor built the first engine for the Wright Flyer when the Wright brothers were unable to buy an engine that fit their needs. It took him six weeks and was quite an endeavor.

Flying Final

Pilot Magazine | Jul 01, 2003

"Good approaches make good landings." You've heard this adage many times in your flying life. And it's true: If you're all set up on the final approach leg of the pattern, the job of gracefully touching down is much, much easier.

Turbine Pilot

Pilot Magazine | Jun 01, 2003

Winning the landing contest "Nice landing," Jeff said, nodding his head appreciatively. The parking checklist was complete and passengers were streaming off the Boeing 737-800 series aircraft at Houston's George Bush Intercontinental Airport.