Safety Advisors

Aircraft Deicing and Anti-icing Equipment

Aircraft Deicing and Anti-icing Equipment

If you shell out thousands of dollars for deicing equipment—whether on a new airplane or retrofitted to an existing older aircraft—you should reasonably expect your investment to see you safely through icy clouds or other freezing precipitation, right? Download it now >>

Aircraft Icing

Aircraft Icing

Winter flying brings the potential for encountering icing conditions in flight. Do you know how to anticipate areas of probable icing? Is your aircraft's anti-icing equipment enough to provide safe flight through ice-laden air? How can you know if your aircraft is accumulating ice on areas you can't see—like the propeller or the tail? This Safety Advisor discusses icing and provides tips on how to avoid this potentially deadly foe. Download it now >>

Airspace for Everyone

Airspace for Everyone

This publication examines the airspace structure and how pilots are expected (and required) to operate within it. Can you define all six airspace categories? Do you know the differences between controlled and uncontrolled airspace? You'll find the answers to these and many other airspace questions. Download it now >>

Cold Facts: Wing Contamination

Any unremoved frost or snow will disrupt airflow over the wings and substantially alter flight characteristics—increased stall speeds, longer takeoff rolls, or an inability to fly at all may be the result. Even a passing snow shower can foul surfaces enough to make flight inadvisable. Download it now >>

Collision Avoidance

Collision Avoidance

Collision avoidance, in the air and on the ground, is one of the most basic responsibilities of a pilot operating an aircraft in VFR conditions. During primary training, pilots are taught to keep their eyes outside the cockpit and look for conflicting traffic. But little formal instruction is given on the best ways to visually identify potential collision threats—or in procedures that can lessen their risk of occurring. Make the strategies and tactics in this Safety Advisor part of your standard procedures to keep the skies safer for you, and for those you share it with. Download it now >>

Do the Right Thing—Decision Making for Pilots

Do the Right Thing-Decision Making for Pilots

It's a sad fact of aviation that, every year, approximately 75% of all aircraft accidents are caused by pilot error, with a very large number the direct result of poor decisions. The good news is that making superior decisions about flying doesn't require superhuman skill or exceptional judgment—just the ability to anticipate and recognize basic problems, and then take timely action to correct them. This Safety Advisor provides practical advice to help you do that, as well as guidance and recommendations for developing your own set of personal minimums. Download it now >>

Emergency Procedures

Emergency Procedures

Practice, planning, and good judgment can improve the odds tremendously, but despite our best intentions, sometimes things just go wrong. In this Safety Advisor, we'll look at ways to handle those critical "up here, wishing you were down there" situations as safely as possible. Download it now >>

Engine Operations

Engine Operations

Do you know what to do if the engine burps and coughs during the runup, or runs rough during cruise? In-depth systems knowledge can give you the tools needed to assess the engine's actual condition. Download it now >>

Federal Aviation Regulations

FARs

The Federal Aviation Regulations (FARs) outline how we become pilots, how our aircraft are certified and built, how we should fly, and much more.  This Safety Advisor describes the structure of the FARs, discusses how they are created and modified, and points out other regulation-related documents all pilots should know about.  Download it now>>

Fuel Awareness

Fuel Awareness

There is much that pilots should know about fuel and fuel management. In this Safety Advisor, we'll discuss these subjects in detail to reduce your chances of having a fuel-related accident. Download it now>>

GPS from the Ground Up

GPS Technology

GPS has been a revolutionary force in the GA cockpit, and it's becoming a bigger part of everyday flying all the time.  As with any technology, though, it carries certain challenges.  In this Safety Advisor, you'll get tips on using GPS to the fullest without sacrificing situational awareness, or your focus on flying the airplane. Download it now >>

Instructor's Guide to the Pre-Solo Written Test

Instructor's Guide to the Pre-Solo Written Test

Do you look at the pre-solo written test as a speed bump on the private pilot road? It's not. A properly designed pre-solo written test serves as a wonderful study guide, in addition to preparation for the first solo flight. However, you need to know the correct way to create and administer a pre-solo test. You need to cover the requirements of the Federal Aviation Regulations, but not make the test so complex that it discourages your students. You want your students to have the technical knowledge to safely solo an airplane. This Safety Advisor can help you and your students to prepare for that all important first solo flight. Download it now >>

Lights-Out

Lights-Out

Picture in your mind several military jets, possibly flying near-supersonic speeds at night, with their exterior lights off. Now picture a general aviation (GA) aircraft flying on the same night. Finally, picture the two aircraft types together in the same airspace in the dark. Truth is, you are already familiar with the flight planning needed to safely share the sky with these aircraft, including the recommended procedures for operating in special use airspace. This Safety Advisor will help you apply that knowledge for the new and specific purpose of safely transiting the new world of Lights-out designated MOAs. Download it now >>

Maneuvering Flight — Hazardous to Your Health?

Maneuvering Flight - Hazardous to Your Health?

More than one-quarter (26.6 percent) of all fatal accidents in the last 10 years occurred during maneuvering flight, which includes buzzing, formation flying, aerial work, stalls/spins, canyon flying, aerobatics, and normal flight operation. Basically, any type of flying performed close to the ground — the traffic pattern, for example — or involving steep turns and aerobatics is considered maneuvering. Read this Safety Advisor to learn about performing maneuvering flight safely. Download it now >>

Mastering Takeoffs and Landings

Ups and Downs of Takeoffs and Landings

More accidents occur in the take off and landing phases of flight than any other. It is the close proximity to the ground that leaves less margin for error. Some pilots never really master the basics, then it's only a matter of time before they have a problem. Is the runway long enough? Are there obstructions? What is the density altitude? Is there a cross-wind? How good is your airspeed control? Do you know how to successfully recover from a bounced landing or when to go around? These are just some of the considerations that are addressed in this new Safety Avisor. Download it now >>

Mountain Flying

Mountain Flying

Mountain flying allows pilots to reach new and exciting destinations while providing adventures and challenges that most flatlanders will never know. As with any new flying adventure, there are also unique risks, most associated with either unforgiving terrain or high density altitude. Download it now >>

Operations at Nontowered Airports

Operations at Nontowered Airports

It's a shorthand way to refer to airports not served by operating air traffic control towers, and that includes most of the airports in the United States. At present, nearly 20,000 airports are nontowered, compared to approximately 500 that have FAA towers. Millions of safe operations in all types of aircraft are conducted at nontowered airports in a variety of weather conditions. It works because pilots put safety first and use commonly known procedures. Download it now >>

Operations at Towered Airports

Operations at Towered Airports

Runway incursions are occurring more frequently each year. This new Safety Advisor gives pilots the information they must know to operate more safely at busy towered airports. [FAA's Runway Safety Program — Visit the the FAA Runway Safety Program Web site for more information.] Download it now >>

Pilot's Guide to the Flight Review

Pilot's Guide to the Flight Review

Whether you're a flight instructor or a pilot getting ready for the flight review. It makes good sense to get the most out of the process. This Safety Advisor will give you the list of the 50 most frequently asked questions, with answers to dispel common misconceptions about the review process. It will help instructors and pilots to identify deteriorating areas that may adversely affect personal flight safety. This Safety Advisor will make the flight review more meaningful and fun. Download it now >>

Propeller Safety

Propeller Safety

Do you know how important it is to maintain and inspect your propeller? This Safety Advisor gives you tips on maintenance, preflight considerations, and other things to look out for in order to have a safe flight. Download it now >>

Say Intentions...When you need ATC's help

Say Intentions...When you need ATC's help

More than 92 percent of all flight assists involve general aviation pilots. Do you know how to ask for ATC assistance during emergency or urgency situations? Read this advisor to learn how ATC can help you, what controllers cannot do to help, and whether you'll have to face paperwork and enforcement action following an emergency. Download it now >>

Single-Pilot IFR

Single-Pilot IFR

Single-pilot IFR is the most challenging flight operation most general aviation pilots face. This Safety Advisor presents suggestions that will stimulate serious thought and discusses proven procedures for safe single-pilot flying. Give yourself an advantage and enjoy safe, efficient IFR flight. Read the Single-Pilot IFR Safety Advisor. Download it now >>

Spatial Disorientation

Spatial Disorientation

We humans are VFR-only creatures. The senses we use to maintain our balance and know "which end is up" are completely unreliable when our bodies are in motion without visual reference to the world around us. No amount of training or experience can overcome this physiological limitation. Pilots deprived of visual references while flying can quickly lose control of the aircraft and succumb to one of general aviation's biggest killers: spatial disorientation. Download it now >>

Thunderstorms and ATC

Thunderstorms and ATC

ATC weather radar can be an invaluable resource for pilots seeking to avoid convective activity. But in order to take advantage of ATC thunderstorm avoidance services, pilots need to have a solid understanding of not only what information is available, but also the limitations of that information and the circumstances under which it's provided. In this Safety Advisor, we'll take a closer look at ATC weather radar services, as well as strategies for dealing with some of nature's most violent storms. Download it now >>

UAS in the USA

UAS in the USA

If you’d believe the news, you’d be convinced that small, homebuilt unmanned aircraft are haphazardly overtaking the National Airspace System (NAS) without any boundaries or rules. The truth is far from that. Sure, there are innovative commercial designs making the news. But in reality, it takes more than a back yard, gizmo, and remote control to make the transformation from the design lab into the NAS. Download it now >>

Volunteer Pilots: Balancing Safety & Compassion

The recommendations and suggestions contained in this booklet were compiled to promote aviation safety especially with regard to charitable volunteer flying. It provides a set of recommendations through which individual pilots can improve their levels of performance and the safety of their flying. It is dedicated to the men and women who selflessly give of their time and talent to ensure that those in need receive help. Download it now >>

WeatherWise

WeatherWise

Weather is the most critical and complex variable that affects your flying. But you don't have to be a meteorologist to understand what makes weather, and use that understanding to help make sound flight decisions. This is what being weather wise is all about ... the ability to integrate official reports and forecasts with what you can see outside to cope with changing flight conditions in the real world. Wouldn't you like to be WeatherWise? Download it now >>