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AOPA Online Members Only -- AOPA ePilot--Vol. 3, Issue 23AOPA Online Members Only -- AOPA ePilot--Vol. 3, Issue 23


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Inside AOPA


On Capitol Hill


Airport Support Network


ASF News


Quiz Me!


2001 Bonanza
Sweepstakes


Coming up in
AOPA Pilot


ePilot Calendar


Weekend Weather




Raytheon announces second round of layoffs
Souped-up Lancair to approach jetlike speeds
Honeywell offers GA traffic, terrain alerting
AOPA sees promise in FAA's air traffic plan
Volume 3, Issue 23
June 8, 2001
GA News
BOEING UNVEILS SATELLITE AIR TRAFFIC PLAN
The Boeing Company unveiled Wednesday its preliminary three-phase plan that aims to dramatically improve the air traffic management system. Boeing claims that aviation would become more efficient, safer, and remain affordable for all users--including GA--under its plan. "Pilots landing or taking off from the smallest unimproved general aviation airfields will enjoy safety features that equal or surpass those at today's best-equipped international airports," it said. The system would rely heavily on enhanced satellite navigation technology to provide precise position data while allowing controllers and pilots to access that data. Boeing also wants to redesign airspace by replacing the complex system of control sectors and segregated flow zones with a simpler configuration. The plan would require new equipment in GA cockpits. "Our thinking is that this equipment shouldn't cost more than a handheld GPS," Boeing told AOPA. Boeing said it would take seven years to fully implement the plan, and would build upon the FAA's Operational Evolution Plan (OEP). See related story below. AOPA is currently evaluating Boeing's proposal. Click here to download the 38-page plan.

RAYTHEON ANNOUNCES SECOND ROUND OF LAYOFFS
Because of lower than expected aircraft delivery rates of Beechjet and King Air turboprop aircraft, Raytheon Aircraft announced that it will lay off more employees. Raytheon said 470 hourly employees will lose their jobs through the end of the year. The news comes after the company announced in April the layoffs of about 450 salaried positions. The company now plans to deliver 468 new aircraft in 2001, 40 fewer than the 508 total aircraft planned for this year.

SOUPED-UP LANCAIR TO APPROACH JETLIKE SPEEDS
Photo of LancairHow fast can a Lancair go? American Engine LLC hopes that one will be able to hit 340 knots with a distinctive five-blade prop, Mustang like airscoop underneath, and 650-hp V-8 engine. The company recently installed its new Eagle 540 liquid-cooled engine in a Lancair IV-P, the first of eight Lancairs built to test the new design. The 540-cubic-inch, fuel-injected engine is controlled by a TADEC (total automatic digital engine control system), providing redundant electronic ignition and fuel control units that switch on automatically if any system component failures are detected. It boasts a weight-to-power ratio of 1.1 pounds per hp. The company expects the 540 to be available to the experimental market in 60 days for about $90,000. Retrofit kits for production aircraft are to follow.

HONEYWELL OFFERS GA TRAFFIC, TERRAIN ALERTING
Honeywell has received FAA approval for new airline-style traffic awareness and terrain avoidance systems for smaller aircraft. The Bendix/King KTA 870 Traffic Awareness System sends a signal that interrogates transponders on nearby aircraft and provides traffic displays and alerts. It's similar to a TCAS I, but at $21,750 is one-third the cost, Honeywell said. The KMH 880 Multihazard Awareness System provides the same traffic detection as the 870, and also features terrain awareness and warnings. Eventually, Bendix/King users will be able to integrate the safety features with weather data on a multifunction display. For more, see the Web site.

NASA CONDUCTS SURVEY FOR FUTURE GA COCKPITS
NASA is conducting a study of how weather data (both graphics and text) should be presented in the general aviation cockpit. It is looking for innovative ideas from pilots. The Web-based survey is being conducted in conjunction with NASA Langley Research Center's Aviation Weather Information (AWIN) project. To help out, see the Web site.

ICAS PROVIDES AIRSHOW PILOT INFO ON WEB
The International Council of Air Shows Inc. is now offering daily updates of information about airshow pilot competency on its Web site. The site provides a list of pilots, aircraft they are approved to fly in, any altitude restrictions, and other information. See the Web site.

For daily news updates, see AOPA Online.

Inside AOPA
AOPA SEES PROMISE IN FAA'S AIR TRAFFIC PLAN
AOPA is encouraged by the FAA's new 10-year blueprint for improvements to increase air transportation system capacity and reduce airline delays, but is working to ensure that the plan's solutions for the airlines do not harm general aviation. The Operational Evolution Plan (OEP), which the FAA presented to the press Wednesday, lays out a timetable for changes to the air traffic control system, airport improvements, and new aircraft communication and navigation equipment requirements. AOPA was among the FAA's key industry partners in developing the plan. "In my 11 years as head of the world's largest aviation organization, I've seen the FAA attempt many grand programs," said Phil Boyer, AOPA president, "but never before have I seen the FAA dedicate so many resources to finding realistic, pragmatic solutions to a national problem." For more, see AOPA Online.

AOPA ARGUES FOR SOLUTION TO O'HARE DELAYS
AOPA argued this week for regional solutions to the delay problems plaguing Chicago's O'Hare International Airport at the first meeting of the O'Hare Delay Task Force. The task force is supposed to "take a fresh look at the factors affecting delay at O'Hare and map out a specific plan to address them," said Chicago Aviation Commissioner Thomas R. Walker. But Chicago's deputy aviation commissioner and cochairman of the task force limited all discussion to just O'Hare airport. "You can't deal with the delay problem in a vacuum," said Andy Cebula, AOPA senior vice president of government and technical affairs. "Any changes at O'Hare will affect aircraft flying throughout the entire region. And reliever airports like Palwaukee and Meigs must be part of the equation if there is going to be a solution to the delay problem." The task force is scheduled to deliver its recommendations in six to nine months.

FAA FINALIZES CERTIFICATION RULE
Despite AOPA's objections, the FAA finalized changes to FAR Part 21 that affect the certification of aircraft and aircraft modifications. In its comments to the FAA on the changed product rule (CPR), AOPA argued that there were no safety data justifying the need to adopt the CPR and cited examples of how general aviation would be adversely affected. The FAA responded by simply saying that it disagreed with AOPA. The association's efforts are now shifting to use the exceptions built into the rule that are intended to ease the regulatory burden on small airplane manufacturers and modification shops. For more, see AOPA Online.

AOPA PUSHES FOR FSS IMPROVEMENTS
AOPA spoke in support of improvements to the flight service station system at the FAA's Flight Service Renaissance Conference in St. Louis this week. AOPA was the sole voice for general aviation pilots at the meeting. The conference focused on improving service to pilots from the flight service station system. Among other things, AOPA asked for more judicious use of the phrase "VFR not recommended" and argued for an interactive briefing capability. AOPA presented the views of GA pilots to more than 200 FAA managers and representatives from the 61 automated flight service stations around the country.

PILOTS LAND IN IFR WEATHER TO ATTEND AOPA FLY-IN
The eleventh annual AOPA Fly-In and Open House nearly became a drive-in as the day dawned last Saturday at Frederick, Maryland, Municipal Airport. Pilots were undaunted despite IFR weather that restricted most arrivals until just before noon. An estimated 4,500 people turned out for this year's event, causing parking lots to overflow. More than 300 aircraft flew in from as far away as California, Florida, Wisconsin, and Ontario, Canada. For more, see AOPA Online.

Changing your mailing or e-mail addresses? Click here to update.
On Capitol Hill
AOPA MEMBER MAY FACE TOUGH REELECTION BID
The Iowa Legislative Services Bureau has just released its second proposal for reapportioning congressional seats in Iowa. As a result, fellow pilot and AOPA member Leonard Boswell (D-Iowa) would be placed in a largely new and certainly more difficult district from which to seek reelection. The Iowa legislature will consider this proposal later this month. Reapportionment occurs in all states after every census in an attempt to balance the population represented by each House member. AOPA will closely follow the fortunes of each member, particularly pilot members, as the process unfolds.

DASCHLE TAKES OVER AS SENATE MAJORITY LEADER
Pilot Tom Daschle (D-S.D.) was recognized as the Senate majority leader for the first time Wednesday. Daschle took the post as a result of Vermont Sen. James Jeffords' decision to become an independent. A major issue still being negotiated by Daschle and now Minority Leader Trent Lott (R-Miss.) is the reorganization of the Senate committees. Currently the Senate Commerce Committee, which has jurisdiction over aviation issues, contains seven Democrats and seven Republicans. Republicans have suggested increasing the size of the committees to create a one-vote Democratic majority. However, according to congressional aides, incoming Commerce Chairman Fritz Hollings (D-S.C.) is pushing to reduce the size of his committee by bumping a Republican. The Republican with the least seniority on the Commerce Committee is Sen. George Allen of Virginia.
Airport Support Network
ASN WORKS TO SAVE NATION'S AIRPORTS
What would you do if your airport closed tomorrow? Every day 910 AOPA Airport Support Network volunteers work with AOPA headquarters on a local level to help save their airports. That's a lot, but not enough. Ask yourself these questions: Has my flying been affected by development, new restrictions, or negative public relations about my local airport? Have local issues or political pressures affected my use and the efficiency of my local airport? If the answer is "yes" to either question, you may be just the kind of person we're looking for to help ensure the health and availability of your airport.

To learn more about the Airport Support Network, visit AOPA Online.
AOPA Air Safety Foundation News
RUNWAY SAFETY REMAINS A PROBLEM FOR AVIATION
In the first three months that the AOPA Air Safety Foundation's runway safety course has been online, nearly 6,000 pilots participated. Have you? Through 2000, the number of runway incursions has been on the rise. Pilot deviations were the leading cause, at 55 percent, compared to controller errors at 25 percent and vehicle deviations at 20 percent. With your help, ASF wants to reverse this trend. Those who complete the program and satisfactorily complete the quiz qualify for the ground portion of the FAA's Wings program. See AOPA Online.
Quiz Me!
Here’s a question asked by an AOPA member last week of our AOPA technical specialists. Test your knowledge.

Question: On the Jeppesen chart I was using, I noticed the abbreviation D-ATIS followed by a frequency. I don't see this on my NACO chart. What does it stand for?

Answer: According to the Jeppesen "Chart Clinic" series ( AOPA Pilot magazine, March 1999) the letter D precedes ATIS since the ATIS is transmitted digitally as well as by the conventional analog voice. This mean that for aircraft so equipped, the ATIS digital signal is received and then displayed in text form on one of the panel displays. To read the Chart Clinic, visit the Jeppesen Web site.

Got a technical question for AOPA specialists? Call 800/872-2672 or e-mail to [email protected]. Send comments on our Quiz Me! questions to [email protected].
AOPA Sweepstakes Bonanza Update
bonanza logo Take a wild cross-country ride with AOPA Pilot Editor at Large Tom Horne as he dodges lightning and flies partial panel in the 2001 AOPA Sweepstakes Bonanza. See AOPA Online.
Coming Up In AOPA Pilot
Fly the Mooney Eagle2, save a dime by buying a Piper Tomahawk, and learn the tricks of the multifunction Garmin 530 in our "On Display" series in the July issue of AOPA Pilot. It will be mailed June 18.
On The Road To Expo
SEAPLANE GROUP OFFERS COURSE AT AOPA EXPO
New for this year's AOPA Expo, the Seaplane Pilots Association will present a complete ground school for the single-engine seaplane rating. The course will also provide a good review of the basics for current seaplane pilots. Presented by Michael Volk, president of the Seaplane Pilots Association, it will take place from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. on November 9. For more on AOPA Expo 2001 in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, see AOPA Online.
What's New At AOPA Online
If you happened to miss the eleventh annual AOPA Fly-In and Open House, take a look at the aircraft static display gallery on AOPA Online.
ePilot Calendar
WEEKEND FLYING DESTINATIONS
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. The Aerospace America International Air Show takes place June 16 and 17 at Clarence Page Municipal Airport (F29). Call 405/685-9546 for event information.

Syracuse, New York. The Syracuse International Air Show takes place June 16 and 17 at Syracuse International Airport. Call 315/454-3263 for event information.

Lock Haven, Pennsylvania. "Sentimental Journey," the Northeast Stearman Fly-In, takes place June 20 through 23 at William T. Piper Memorial Airport (LHV). Call 570/893-4200 for event information.

Terrell, Texas. The Ercoupe National Convention takes place June 21 at Terrell Municipal Airport (TRL). Call 972/524-1601 for event information.

For more airport details, see AOPA's Airport Directory Online . For more events, see Aviation Calendar of Events

ASF SAFETY SEMINARS
The next AOPA ASF Safety Seminars are scheduled in Honolulu June 9 and 10; Fort Worth, Texas, and Albany, New York, June 11; North Syracuse, New York, and Oklahoma City June 12; Tulsa, Oklahoma, and Rochester, New York, June 13; and Buffalo, New York, and Rogers, Arkansas, June 14. See AOPA Online for more information.

ASF FLIGHT INSTRUCTOR REFRESHER CLINICS
(All clinics start at 7:30 a.m.)
The next AOPA Air Safety Foundation Flight Instructor Refresher Clinics are scheduled in Minneapolis and Las Vegas, June 16 and 17. For the Flight Instructor Refresher Clinic schedule, see AOPA Online.

ASF PINCH-HITTER GROUND-SCHOOL COURSES
(Pinch-Hitter courses start at 9:30 a.m.)
The next Pinch-Hitter� Ground School will take place June 24 in Columbus, Ohio. For more Pinch-Hitter courses, see AOPA Online.

For comments on calendar items or to make submissions, contact Julie S. Walker at [email protected].

Contacting ePilot
Got news tips? Contact ePilot editor Nathan A. Ferguson at [email protected] Having difficulty using this service? Visit the ePilot Frequently Asked Questions now at AOPA Online or write to [email protected].

Changing your mailing or e-mail addresses? Click here to update.

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