Already a member? Please login below for an enhanced experience. Not a member? Join today
Menu

Take ethanol out of the mix for aviation fuel, AOPA saysTake ethanol out of the mix for aviation fuel, AOPA says

Take ethanol out of the mix for aviation fuel, AOPA says

Airplane at the pump

As states look for alternatives to petroleum-based fuels, AOPA is making sure legislators know about the harm ethanol can do to aircraft engines.

Hawaii, Michigan, and New York are the latest states to formally push for the diversification of fuel resources. AOPA, in response, has initiated a public education campaign.

Ethanol deteriorates seals in aircraft engines, harms fuel bladders and hoses, and attracts water, which promotes rust that can damage cylinders and pistons. It also can lead to problems in electric fuel pumps and cause inaccurate indications on fuel gauges, according to FAA studies.

"Since fuel blends, including ethanol, cannot be used in general aviation aircraft at this time, AOPA strongly supports an exemption for avgas from any legislation mandating a renewable fuel component," wrote AOPA Vice President of Regional Affairs Greg Pecoraro to legislators.

Pecoraro also recommended an exemption for automobile gasoline with an octane rating of 91 or higher because some aircraft have supplemental type certificates to burn this fuel.

February 23, 2007

Related Articles

Take ethanol out of the mix for aviation fuel, AOPA says

Airplane at the pump

As states look for alternatives to petroleum-based fuels, AOPA is making sure legislators know about the harm ethanol can do to aircraft engines.

Hawaii, Michigan, and New York are the latest states to formally push for the diversification of fuel resources. AOPA, in response, has initiated a public education campaign.

Ethanol deteriorates seals in aircraft engines, harms fuel bladders and hoses, and attracts water, which promotes rust that can damage cylinders and pistons. It also can lead to problems in electric fuel pumps and cause inaccurate indications on fuel gauges, according to FAA studies.

"Since fuel blends, including ethanol, cannot be used in general aviation aircraft at this time, AOPA strongly supports an exemption for avgas from any legislation mandating a renewable fuel component," wrote AOPA Vice President of Regional Affairs Greg Pecoraro to legislators.

Pecoraro also recommended an exemption for automobile gasoline with an octane rating of 91 or higher because some aircraft have supplemental type certificates to burn this fuel.

February 23, 2007

Related Articles