Not a member? Join today. Already a member? Please login for an enhanced experience. Login Now
Menu

NAV Canada to update procedure-clearance phraseologyNAV Canada to update procedure-clearance phraseology

NAV Canada announced that it will implement International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) phraseology April 27 “to explicitly indicate to flight crews if they should abide by speed and altitude restrictions associated with a given procedure” on standard instrument departures (SIDs) and standard terminal arrivals (STARs).

Image courtesy of NBAA.

The key terms “climb via” and “descend via” that will be implemented for use by air traffic controllers and pilots are intended to eliminate misinterpretations of altitude clearances and restrictions by flight crews.

Although the terms are identical to phraseology introduced in the United States in recent years to clarify how the vertical profiles of published procedures should be flown, there are differences in their applicability, as summarized by detailed guidance provided by the National Business Aviation Association. Detailed information and tutorials are available on NBAA's performance-based navigation web page.

In November 2016, ICAO revised its Air Traffic Management document  to include climb/descend via phraseology.

Pilots who fly internationally can expect to encounter the new phraseology more frequently, said Rune Duke, AOPA director of airspace and air traffic.

He recommended that pilots familiarize themselves with the aeronautical information publications for countries to which they will fly and note differences in meaning between the FAA and other countries’ air navigation service providers.

AOPA participates in the FAA’s Performance-Based Aviation Rulemaking Committee and the Pilot and Controller Procedures & System Integration Working Group, which have focused on making flight crews aware of the phraseology update, Duke said.

Dan Namowitz

Dan Namowitz

Associate Editor Web
Associate Editor Web Dan Namowitz has been writing for AOPA in a variety of capacities since 1991. He has been a flight instructor since 1990 and is a 30-year AOPA member.
Topics: NextGen, FAA Information and Services, Navigation

Related Articles