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Rep. Shuster's bill could set off budget sequestrationRep. Shuster's bill could set off budget sequestration

While Rep. Bill Shuster (R-Pa.), Chairman of the House Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure, continues to arm twist and cajole members of Congress to support handing over our nation’s air traffic control system to a board of special interests, another damaging report about the legislation from the Congressional Research Service (CRS) has recently surfaced contending that the legislation would set off a budget sequester if the costs of the proposal are not offset by savings in other areas.

Chairman of the House Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure Bill Shuster speaks at a committee hearing on "Oversight of U.S. Airline Customer Service," in the aftermath of the recent forced removal of a passenger from a Chicago flight, at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C., May 2, 2017. File photo by Kevin Lamarque, REUTERS.

In a memo to House Transportation Committee members released earlier this week, the CRS stated that H.R. 2997 would result in a $98.5 billion deficit increase and cause cuts to nonexempt mandatory spending programs. Programs like Medicare and the Federal Emergency Management Agency National Flood Insurance Fund could be threatened with cuts if the legislation passes.

Recently the Congressional Budget Office released a report stating that H.R. 2997 would add $100 billion to the federal deficit over a 10-year period. Additionally, if it fails financially, this “too big to fail” entity would eventually leave taxpayers on the hook for bailouts.

Meanwhile general aviation remains focused on modernizing our already efficient ATC system and continues to reach out to Congress to oppose this monopolization being pushed by the airlines.

Even though members of Congress have received more than 150,000 letters and phone calls from AOPA members, this fight is not over yet. AOPA encourages members to continue to contact their members in the House of Representatives.

AOPA Communications staff

Topics: Advocacy

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