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AOPA AIR SAFETY INSTITUTE OFFERS NEW SAFETY COURSE ON TRANSITIONING TO DIFFERENT AIRPLANESAOPA AIR SAFETY INSTITUTE OFFERS NEW SAFETY COURSE ON TRANSITIONING TO DIFFERENT AIRPLANES

March 27, 2015

          Contact: Steve Hedges
                        301-695-2159
                        [email protected]

FREDERICK, MD – The Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association’s (AOPA) Air Safety Institute (ASI) has released a new course to help pilots safely make the switch from flying a familiar airplanes to one they’ve never flown before—or haven’t flown for a long while.

ASI’s “Transitioning to Other Airplanes” gives pilots vital factors to consider as they step from one airplane to another, no matter if the transition is from a trainer to a complex single-engine, an airliner to a tailwheel airplane, or from an airplane with traditional analog instruments to one with a modern glass panel.

While transitioning to a different airplane is a rewarding achievement, statistics show that one of the most vulnerable times for pilots is during the first 10 hours of flight in a new, unfamiliar airplane.

Like all ASI safety courses, this new transition course is available to all pilots, not just AOPA members. It was made possible with the support of private and public partners, including the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), the General Aviation Manufacturers Association (GAMA) and AOPA.

 “Transitioning to Other Airplanes” explains both the obvious and subtle nuances that can trap pilots of any level. The course offers pilots the option of selecting any of the five tracks aimed at the type of transition they are planning, and it recommends ways to find a qualified flight instructor to support a safe transition.

The course also includes several instructive accident case studies involving pilots who transitioned to different aircraft. The interactive course is also optimized for use on mobile devices.

“Whether a pilot wants to move up or down the performance scale, into an experimental, or fly a different airplane with similar performance, this course covers the areas they need to know before making that transition,” said George Perry, senior vice president of the Air Safety Institute. “It’s great that the GA community could cooperatively produce a comprehensive transition course that allows pilots to focus on known risks during the first five to 10 hours spent flying a ‘new’ airplane. Every pilot who is changing airplanes should take a few minutes to work through this course.”

Find the course here.

ASI has since 1950 served all pilots and aviation enthusiasts—not just AOPA members—by providing free safety education programs, analyzing safety data, and conducting safety research. ASI offers award-winning online courses, nearly 200 live seminars annually throughout the U.S., flight instructor refresher courses, safety videos, accident case studies, and other materials to help pilots be safer and better informed. To learn more, visit www.airsafetyinstitute.org.

 

ABOUT AOPA

Since 1939, AOPA has protected the freedom to fly for thousands of pilots, aircraft owners and aviation enthusiasts. AOPA is the world’s largest aviation member association, with representatives based in Frederick, Md., Washington, D.C., Wichita, Kans., and seven regions across the United States. AOPA provides member services that range from advocacy at the federal, state, and local levels to legal services, flight planning products, safety programs and award-winning media. To learn more, visit www.aopa.org .

 

- AOPA

15-1-028

AOPA Communications staff

Topics: Safety and Education, General Aviation Manufacturers Association, Aviation Organizations

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