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Embraer evolves the Phenom 100Embraer evolves the Phenom 100

New derivative improves performance, brings Garmin G3000New derivative improves performance, brings Garmin G3000

In a response to softening sales of its entry-level Phenom 100, Embraer announced the updated 100 EV during EAA AirVenture. A new engine upgrade and Garmin G3000 Prodigy panel are the hallmarks of the new offerings.
The Embraer Phenom 100 EV will feature a Garmin G3000 Prodigy panel.

The 100 EV will take advantage of the upgraded Pratt & Whitney PW617F1-E engines. Embraer says it expects 15 percent better performance in hot and high situations, about 15 more knots in cruise, and a four-occupant range of 1,178 nautical miles.

More enticing to some buyers will be the leap forward to Garmin G3000 avionics, which Embraer brands as Prodigy Touch. This is the panel in the Phenom 300, the 100’s big brother. The integrated touchscreen cockpit will offer customers significantly more capability, including a touch screen keypad controller and larger split screens.

Rendering of the Embraer Phenom 100EV

Two previous Phenom 100 orders were converted to 100 EVs and announced as launch customers. Mexico’s Across is a large charter operation based at 8,000 feet. The company is a current Embraer customer. Emirates also purchased a 100 EV for its forthcoming flight training academy in Dubai. Embraer said it expects to be certified and delivering the new aircraft sometime in the middle of next year.

Despite those orders, the United States remains the company’s biggest market for business aviation. Embraer recently celebrated its 1,000th business jet delivery—more than half of those deliveries have come to the United States. And the company’s Melbourne, Florida, manufacturing facility is assembling Phenoms, with plans to include the Legacy line. Embraer employs more than 150 engineers at its growing American footprint.

Ian J. Twombly

Ian J. Twombly

"Flight Training" Editor
AOPA Pilot and Flight Training Editor Ian J. Twombly joined AOPA in 2003 and is an instrument flight instructor.
Topics: EAA AirVenture, Jet

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