Sun Flyer prototype deliveredSun Flyer prototype delivered

Editor's note: An earlier version of this story incorrectly stated the power of the Sun Flyer motor. AOPA regrets the error.
AEAC’s proof-of-concept Sun Flyer on the ramp at Denver’s Centennial Airport
AEAC’s proof-of-concept Sun Flyer on the ramp at Denver’s Centennial Airport
The Sun Flyer interior. Systems have yet to be installed.

The airplane still needs to have its electrical system, motor, and instrument panel installed. After that, it will go on to ground and taxi tests. A formal rollout ceremony is planned soon, AEAC said. The company is based at Centennial Airport.

George Bye, AEAC’s CEO, thanked his board of directors, strategic advisors, and shareholders, saying, “This is a major milestone in the Sun Flyer program.” AEAC contracted with Arion Aircraft from the Nashville, Tennessee, area to help build an initial prototype.

Bye said the Sun Flyer will have broadband and iPad connectivity as part of its flight training system. Redbird Simulations’ Sidekick also will be on board, he said. Sidekick will keep track of motor parameters, flight time, airplane position, attitude, and landings. This information will be transmitted to ground stations where flight schools can track the airplane’s status.

“The addition of Sidekick is a collaborative opportunity to further enhance a comprehensive flight training system for Sun Flyer,” said Redbird’s Jerry Gregoire.

The Sun Flyer is intended to be the first FAA-certified all-electric trainer. For more information, visit

AEAC's proof-of-concept Sun Flyer on the ramp at Denver's Centennial Airport. Courtesy photo.

Aero Electric Aircraft Corp. of Denver has taken delivery of its Sun Flyer, a proof-of-concept, two-seat, solar-electric-powered trainer.

Thomas A. Horne

Thomas A. Horne

AOPA Pilot Editor at Large
AOPA Pilot Editor at Large Tom Horne has worked at AOPA since the early 1980s. He began flying in 1975 and has an airline transport pilot and flight instructor certificates. He’s flown everything from ultralights to Gulfstreams and ferried numerous piston airplanes across the Atlantic.
Topics: Solar, Aviation Industry, Technology

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